We talked about some of the common phrases and terms that you might encounter when you purchase your office signs and other signage needs. Here are a few more terms that you are highly likely to see when visiting sign sites and when you are contemplating what choices to make for your sign requirements:


  • Epoxy – a very strong adhesive that is used to make two substrates adhere to each other in a strong bond.
  • Façade – the front of a building. Can also be used to speak about the primary entrance of a building.
  • Font – this is the term used for the style, design and width of certain letters, numbers and symbols. Examples of such include Helvetica Bold Condensed, Times Roman and Sans Serif. Before computers were used for scaling these letters, symbols and numbers, fonts were also referenced with the use of their size, like 12-point.
  • Ground Sign – these are signs that are mounted on braces or walls without the help of secondary support. These are essentially free standing signs.
  • Header – this is what you oftentimes see at the very top of signs. Some headers are compliant with certain regulatory entities like OSHA and ANSI. Examples of headers that you can find on a number of signs include Danger and Notice.
  • Lacquer – a finishing material that is clear and can be used to finish signs without having to worry about the presence of dust. Quick drying and similar to varnish, this is often used for binding certain sign pigments.
  • Laminate – process that is used to bind a number of layered materials together to form what is called a substrate or to protect an underlying layer.
  • Logo – this is the stylized words, symbols or letters used by a company to represent their product or their business.
  • Medium Density Overlay (MDO) – plywood used for sign making. Ideal for outdoor use when a veneer is applied on both sides.
  • Pantone Matching System (PMS) – no, this is not THAT kind of PMS you are thinking about. This PMS is a standardized series of colors that come with a specific identification number and formulation for each shade. These shades are then duplicated in computer programs and swatch books for use when exact duplication of a particular color is needed.
  • Plexiglas – often used as a common term for acrylic sheets, this is actually a trade name for a certain variety of acrylic sheeting often used for signmaking.